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Camden power station
Camden power station

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Hendrina power station
Hendrina power station

More coal-fired power station giants, to be erected in the Eastern Transvaal, were announced in the 1960s. Camden (1 600 MW), Hendrina (2 000 MW), Arnot (2 100 MW), Kriel (3 000 MW) and Grootvlei (1200 MW) were erected. Grootvlei power station pioneered the use of a dry-cooling tower system. Some of these stations were only completed in the 1970s, increasing Escom’s power generation capacity dramatically. Escom assisted South Africa’s unparalleled economic growth by accommodating the country’s electrical power needs

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Arnot power station
Arnot power station

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Kriel power station
Kriel power station

Eskom’s annual power sales reached 16 000 million units in 1960. These sales showed an increase of 133% over a ten-year period. Generation plant capacity had increased by 130%, while R376 million had been spent on new power stations, transmission and distribution systems. Dr J T Hattingh’s term of office as Escom’s Chairman ended in 1962. He was succeeded by Dr R L Straszacker.

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Grootvlei power station
Grootvlei power station

Apollo substation
Apollo substation

Discussions on the establishment of Cahora Bassa hydro-electric power station on the Zambezi River, in Mozambique, started in 1965. Dr Straszacker handled the negotiations, that started in 1968, between the South African and Portuguese governments. It was intended to supply electrical power along a 1 400 km route to South Africa. Apollo substation, established by Escom, received the first power transmitted from Cahora Bassa in May 1975. The civil war in Mozambique caused an interruption of electrical power supply from this source.

Cahora Bassa

A national power network was established in the 1960s. This network was destined to link the Transvaal power stations with the Cape Province undertaking. The lack of coal made it cheaper to transport electricity to the Cape Province via power lines from the north. The announcement of the Orange River Project, which would provide a power source halfway, made this 400 kV link viable. The transmission line to Beaufort West was completed in 1969. Power then flowed from Eastern Transvaal into the Western Cape distribution system.
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Pre-1962 Eskom Logo

The logo that was introduced in 1962.


This webpage was last updated on the 29 April, 2004

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